Category Archives: Upcoming Event

Wednesday 3rd March 2021 – BAS Study Group

The Agenda for this meeting is:

Ankerwycke Again: Andrew Hutt –  New evidence which came to light in February 2021

Roman Thatcham progress report:  Keith Abbott

Wormstall Geophysics survey:   Keith Abbot and Andrew Hut

Project starting April 2021? Surveying a 1 hectare (100m x 100m square) in a day. Learning to use QGIS to create the Wormstall image stack

This meeting will be conducted on Zoom starting at 3pm. Regular participants will receive an email with login details. Anyone else wishing to join should contact Andrew Hutt on andrew_hutt(at)talktalk.net

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Thursday 22nd April – Marlow Lecture: Tutankhamun

Invitation from Marlow Archaeology

A Zoom lecture starting at 8pm

Tutankhamun: The Boy King and his treasures

by Erica Morland, co-founder of Thames Valley ancient Egypt society

Tutankhamun, the New Kingdom’s famous 18th Dynasty Egyptian boy king/ pharaoh was the last ruler of his royal family line. His father was (probably) the pharaoh Akhenaten, who some believed to be the mummy found in the tomb KV55. His mother was (probably) his father’s sister, sister identified through DNA testing as an unknown mummy referred to as “The Younger Lady”
Tutankhamun was involved in the restoration of the Ancient Egyptian religion after its dissolution by Akhenaten- the heretic pharaoh and began restoring old monuments damaged during the previous Amarna period.

Erica is an enthusiastic amateur Egyptologist, she got the bug as a six-year-old when she was able to see an unwrapped head of a mummy in a case at the Hancock museum in Newcastle. This became a fascination after seeing the Tutankhamun exhibition at the BM in 1972. 
Erica’s particular interests are Ancient Egyptian food and farming (having worked in the food industry for 35 years), and the lives of Ancient Egyptian Women.  In 1994, she with two friends, set up the Thames Valley Ancient Egypt Society and has been a committee member ever since. She has visited most of the major sites in Egypt, and has dragged he (long suffering) husband all over the world visiting Ancient Egyptian collections as far apart as Tokyo, New York, Turin and Sydney.

Free to MAS and AIM members. £3.00 for non-members. 
Ticket Source is open for booking on our website: 
https://www.marlowarchaeology.org/booking.php 
You will be sent the entry link to the meeting shortly before the event

Saturday 20th March 2021 – BAS Lecture: Late Iron Age oppida

Late Iron Age territorial oppida in Southern Britain: a reinterpretation using new data collected from aerial photographs and lidar 

by Krystyna Truscoe, Doctoral research student, University of Reading

Oppida appear between the late 2nd century BC and early 1st century AD in Britain, the late Iron Age. Territorial oppida are characterised as being large in size, associated with substantial linear earthworks or dykes, and with a range of social and economic functions which relate to their position as important political centres or focal places for communities. My research focusses on three such sites in southern Britain: Chichester, Colchester and Silchester. While some landscape-scale surveys have been undertaken, the features of territorial oppida Krystyna’s lecture will cover her doctoral research into the landscapes of three sites classified as `territorial oppida’ in southern Britain.  Oppida appear between the late 2nd century BC and early 1st century AD in Britain, the late Iron Age. ‘Territorial oppida’ are characterised as being large in size, associated with substantial linear earthworks or dykes, and with a range of social and economic functions which relate to their position as important political centres or focal places for communities. Krystyna’s research focusses on three such sites: Chichester, Colchester and Silchester.

While some landscape-scale surveys have been undertaken, the features of ‘territorial oppida’ have tended to be studied in isolation and, often, without using airborne remote sensing methods either to examine the sites themselves or their environs. Krystyna has used these techniques to contextualise these sites, to analyse how they might have developed and the relationships they may have had with settlements within their environs.  Considerable information can be added even to well-studied sites by making connections between them and their landscape settings using information derived from aerial photograph and lidar interpretation. Krystyna collected new data from aerial photographs and lidar and combined it with information from other sources for her three case study areas, in order to establish as consistent a baseline of archaeological knowledge as is possible with which to compare them.  She will reveal the outcome of her research.

Krystyna has recently completed her doctoral research, using aerial photographs and LiDAR to examine the landscapes of territorial oppida in southern Britain, focusing on Chichester, Silchester and Colchester.  She previously worked on large-scale aerial photograph and lidar survey projects for local councils, universities and Historic England, including the South Downs National Park and the Mendip Hills AONB, and as a Historic Environment Record Officer in Greater London.  She has also been part of the Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa project team (University of Oxford).  In January this year she began work as the Historic Environment Advisor for Forestry England East district. @KrysiaTruscoe

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic the above will be conducted on Zoom.  Details of how to join the lectures, which will commence as usual at 2.30pm, will be communicated nearer the time

Non-members are welcome to attend the Society’s lectures which are currently taking place on Zoom.  There is no charge for this. Places can be requested by emailing lectures(at)berksarch.co.uk a minimum of 3 working days beforehand (i.e. the Wednesday before the lecture at the absolute latest)

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